Answered By: Katie Hutchison
Last Updated: Aug 08, 2016     Views: 172

Which fields allow "I"?

The rules for this are changing, so it's always best to ask your instructor if you're not sure about using first person. But here are some general guidelines:

Sciences: In the past, scientific writers avoided the use of "I" because scientists often view the first person as interfering with the impression of objectivity and impersonality they are seeking to create. But conventions seem to be changing in some cases—for instance, when a scientific writer is describing a project she is working on or positioning that project within the existing research on the topic. Check with your science instructor to find out whether it's o.k. to use "I" in his/her class.

Social Sciences: Some social scientists try to avoid "I" for the same reasons that other scientists do. But first person is becoming more commonly accepted, especially when the writer is describing his/her project or perspective.

Humanities: Ask your instructor whether you should use "I." The purpose of writing in the humanities is generally to offer your own analysis of language, ideas, or a work of art. Writers in these fields tend to value assertiveness and to emphasize agency (who's doing what), so the first person is often—but not always—appropriate. Sometimes writers use the first person in a less effective way, preceding an assertion with "I think," "I feel," or "I believe" as if such a phrase could replace a real defense of an argument. While your audience is generally interested in your perspective in the humanities fields, readers do expect you to fully argue, support, and illustrate your assertions. Personal belief or opinion is generally not sufficient in itself; you will need evidence of some kind to convince your reader.

Other writing situations: If you're writing a speech, use of the first and even the second person ("you") is generally encouraged because these personal pronouns can create a desirable sense of connection between speaker and listener and can contribute to the sense that the speaker is sincere and involved in the issue.

If you're writing a resume, though, avoid the first person; describe your experience, education, and skills without using a personal pronoun (for example, under "Experience" you might write "Volunteered as a peer counselor.").


A note on the second person "you"
:

In situations where your intention is to sound conversational and friendly because it suits your purpose, as it does in this handout intended to offer helpful advice, or in a letter or speech, "you" might help to create just the sense of familiarity you're after. But in most academic writing situations, "you" sounds overly conversational, as for instance in a claim like "when you read the poem 'The Wasteland,' you feel a sense of emptiness." In this case, the "you" sounds overly conversational. The statement would read better as "The poem 'The Wasteland' creates a sense of emptiness." Academic writers almost always use alternatives to the second person pronoun, such as "one," "the reader," or "people."

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